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Detection of a Major Gene for Resistance to Fusiform Rust Disease in Loblolly Pine by Genomic Mapping

Phillip L. Wilcox, Henry V. Amerson, E. George Kuhlman, Ben-Hui Liu, David M. O'Malley and Ronald R. Sederoff
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 93, No. 9 (Apr. 30, 1996), pp. 3859-3864
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/39157
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Detection of a Major Gene for Resistance to Fusiform Rust Disease in Loblolly Pine by Genomic Mapping
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Abstract

Genomic mapping has been used to identify a region of the host genome that determines resistance to fusiform rust disease in loblolly pine where no discrete, simply inherited resistance factors had been previously found by conventional genetic analyses over four decades. A resistance locus, behaving as a single dominant gene, was mapped by association with genetic markers, even-though the disease phenotype deviated from the expected Mendelian ratio. The complexity of forest pathosystems and the limitations of genetic analysis, based solely on phenotype, had led to an assumption that effective long-term disease resistance in trees should be polygenic. However, our data show that effective long-term resistance can be obtained from a single qualitative resistance gene, despite the presence of virulence in the pathogen population. Therefore, disease resistance in this endemic coevolved forest pathosystem is not exclusively polygenic. Genomic mapping now provides a powerful tool for characterizing the genetic basis of host pathogen interactions in forest trees and other undomesticated organisms, where conventional genetic analysis often is limited or not feasible.

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