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Ce Cri rompit le cauchemar qui l'opprimait: Huysmans and the Politics of A rebours

Richard Shryock
The French Review
Vol. 66, No. 2 (Dec., 1992), pp. 243-254
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/397573
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ce Cri rompit le cauchemar qui l'opprimait: Huysmans and the Politics of A rebours
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Abstract

Although Joris-Karl Huysmans is known as a quintessentially apolitical writer, A rebours was admired by some contemporaries specifically for its political character. While not an anarchist novel, A rebours does employ subversive strategies similar to those used by anarchists. The novel presents significant homologies to anarchist thought and a thematics similar to anarchist literature. Both Huysmans's correspondence and A rebours show that in the early 1880s he rejected political parties, but was not apolitical: his views shared much in common with anarchism. An analysis of the novel shows a continuum between Huysmans's social thought and esthetics.

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