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(Dis)embodiments of the Father in Maghrebian Fiction

Eva L. Corredor
The French Review
Vol. 66, No. 2 (Dec., 1992), pp. 295-304
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/397578
Page Count: 10
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(Dis)embodiments of the Father in Maghrebian Fiction
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Abstract

Among the major problems dramatized in the fiction of postcolonial, Maghrebian writers such as Mourad Bourboune, Rachid Boudjedra, and Tahar Ben Jelloun is the existential need of the younger generation of Arabic men and women to overcome the enormous embodiment of power in the figure of the family patriarch. Sons and daughters feel chained by culture and tradition to this mythically aggrandized body. Their only way to salvation seems to lead through various forms of "(dis)embodiments" of the father. Only his death enables them to gain freedom and authenticity.

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