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Persistence, Efficacy, and Selectivity of Amide Herbicides in Corn

Ioannis B. Vasilakoglou and Ilias G. Eleftherohorinos
Weed Technology
Vol. 17, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 2003), pp. 381-388
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3989325
Page Count: 8
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Persistence, Efficacy, and Selectivity of Amide Herbicides in Corn
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Abstract

Persistence of microencapsulated (ME) and emulsifiable concentrate (EC) formulations of alachlor and acetochlor, as well as EC formulations of metolachlor, s-metolachlor, dimethenamid, and flufenacet were studied using a bioassay based on root response of oat Kassandra grown in soil. Flufenacet was the most persistent of the herbicides, but biologically available residues were not detected at 0- to 10-cm soil depth 50 d after any herbicide treatment. All herbicides applied preemergence (PRE) in field trials gave good to excellent control of redroot pigweed, black nightshade, barnyardgrass, and green foxtail but only partial control of jimsonweed. Furthermore, when they were applied postemergence (POST) in mixture with atrazine in the field, the control obtained for black nightshade, common lambsquarters, common purslane, and redroot pigweed was excellent, but good to excellent for bristly foxtail and green foxtail. Their efficacy against yellow foxtail and large crabgrass was fair to good. Generally, the EC-alachlor and EC-acetochlor applied POST in mixture with atrazine gave better control of grasses than did their ME-formulations. None of the herbicide treatments showed any phytotoxic effect on corn, and all of them produced corn yield greater than that of weedy control but slightly lower than that of the weed-free control. Flufenacet, s-metolachlor, and dimethenamid were suitable alternatives to acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor.

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