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Revegetation Strategies after Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Control in Headwater, Transitional, and Depositional Watershed Areas

John P. Taylor and Kirk C. McDaniel
Weed Technology
Vol. 18, Invasive Weed Symposium (2004), pp. 1278-1282
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3989634
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Revegetation Strategies after Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) Control in Headwater, Transitional, and Depositional Watershed Areas
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Abstract

The exotic saltcedar occupies headwater, transitional, and depositional watershed portions, and revegetation strategies can be quite different depending on these locations. Regardless of specific socioeconomic or biological needs (or both), sites must often be revegetated after control to avoid reinfestation or invasion by other exotic species. Where natural riparian hydrologic processes continue to function, natural regeneration can be used as an effective restoration mechanism. However, in altered river systems, harsh environmental site characteristics may occur that severely limit revegetation potential after control, particularly in depositional areas. Because of high costs associated with saltcedar control, revegetation, and follow-up management, specific treatment areas should be evaluated and prioritized based on revegetation potential. Specific consideration should be given to the establishment of sustainable plant communities for long-term exclusion of saltcedar and other exotics.

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