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Survey of Soybean Weeds in Mississippi

Alfred Rankins, Jr., John D. Byrd, Jr., Donald B. Mask, Jimmy W. Barnett and Patrick D. Gerard
Weed Technology
Vol. 19, No. 2 (Apr. - Jun., 2005), pp. 492-498
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3989739
Page Count: 7
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Survey of Soybean Weeds in Mississippi
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Abstract

A survey was conducted in 2000 across 38 counties in Mississippi on 192 randomly selected soybean fields to assess the most common occurring weeds. Statewide, prickly sida, which was present in 40% of the fields sampled, was the most common. Pitted and entireleaf morningglory were present in 34 and 29% of the soybean fields, respectively. Broadleaf signalgrass and barnyard-grass were the most common annual grasses, and yellow nutsedge was the most common sedge observed. Trumpetcreeper and redvine were the most common perennial vines. In the Mississippi Delta region of Mississippi, prickly sida was present in 45% of the fields sampled. The trend of occurrence of other species in the Delta mirrored statewide results. In eastern Mississippi, prickly sida and broadleaf signalgrass were found in 43% of soybean fields. Sicklepod, common cocklebur, and balloonvine were more prevalent in eastern Mississippi, when compared with the Mississippi Delta. Since 1982, there has been a sevenfold decline in the occurrence of common cocklebur and a fourfold decline in the occurrence of johnsongrass in Mississippi soybean. Also, the occurrences of redroot pigweed, common ragweed, and fall panicum have declined. Conversely, the occurrences of yellow nutsedge and broadleaf signalgrass have increased. The occurrences of barnyardgrass, prickly sida, redvine and trumpetcreeper have been relatively static over the past two decades.

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