Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

APEC and Its Enemies: The Failure of the New Regionalism in the Asia-Pacific

Mark T. Berger
Third World Quarterly
Vol. 20, No. 5, New Regionalisms in the New Millenium (Oct., 1999), pp. 1013-1030
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3993609
Page Count: 18
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
APEC and Its Enemies: The Failure of the New Regionalism in the Asia-Pacific
Preview not available

Abstract

This article looks at the rise of APEC as a vehicle for the promotion of free trade in the Asia-Pacific. It argues that, although the Japanese government was more interested in trade cooperation than free trade, it played a key role, along with the Australian government, in the establishment of APEC, while the main challenge to APEC came from the Malaysian Prime Minister, Mahathir Mohamed. During the 1990s, however, Mahathir's proposal for an East Asian Economic Bloc which excluded the USA, Australia, New Zealand and all other 'non-Asian' nation-states, was incorporated into APEC and took the name of the East Asian Economic Caucus. The accommodation of Mahathir's proposal to the APEC process, and his inability to get Japanese support for his pan-Asian initiative, symbolised the limits on any and all regional challenges to US hegemony in the Asia-Pacific. The article also emphasises that, with the coming of the East Asian crisis, the prospects of a successful regional challenge to US hegemony have become even more remote. In particular, the growing influence of the IMF in the region since the crisis has made APEC irrelevant, while the inability of regional elites to deal with the crisis in a unified fashion has thrown into sharp relief the serious obstacles which exist to any pan-Asian effort to challenge neoliberalism. At the same time, although the East Asian crisis has precipitated a reassertion of US hegemony and a consolidation of neoliberalism, the present juncture may also herald the start of a crisis of neoliberalism, with regional and international implications.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1013
    1013
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1014
    1014
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1015
    1015
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1016
    1016
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1017
    1017
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1018
    1018
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1019
    1019
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1020
    1020
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1021
    1021
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1022
    1022
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1023
    1023
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1024
    1024
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1025
    1025
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1026
    1026
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1027
    1027
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1028
    1028
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1029
    1029
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1030
    1030