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Floristic Investigation of Lemnos Island (NE Aegean Area, Greece)

Maria Panitsa, Britt Snogerup, Sven Snogerup and Dimitrios Tzanoudakis
Willdenowia
Bd. 33, H. 1 (Aug. 29, 2003), pp. 79-105
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3997537
Page Count: 27
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Floristic Investigation of Lemnos Island (NE Aegean Area, Greece)
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Abstract

Lemnos island and its 10 offshore islets belong to the Prefecture of Lesvos and biogeographically to the N Aegean area. In comparison with other islands of the N Aegean area, Lemnos is characterized by an intense horizontal relief, absence of limestone cliffs, low land formations (highest point 429 m), medium inclination and intense human interference (agriculture, stock farming) almost on the entire island. Including the data from the available literature and the authors' investigations, the flora of the area consists of about 681 plant taxa. The dominance of the Mediterranean elements and therophytes reflect the Mediterranean character of the Lemnos flora. Although its flora is rather poor, Lemnos conserves a high level ecological value based on the existence of a variety of different vegetation formations and habitat types such as wetlands, sand dunes, remnants of Quercus ithaburensis subsp. macrolepis forest and extended phryganic formations all over the island. The natural ecosystems (wetlands, sand dunes, etc.) have been degraded because of the intense human activities (extended agriculture, over-grazing, tourist facilities, etc.) and for this reason the adaptation of management measures is necessary for the conservation of the ecological value of the area.

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