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Acoustic Behavior of Tropisternus ellipticus, T. columbianus, and T. lateralis limbalis in Western Oregon (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae)

Lee C. Ryker
The Coleopterists Bulletin
Vol. 30, No. 2 (Jun., 1976), pp. 147-156
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3999809
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Acoustic Behavior of Tropisternus ellipticus, T. columbianus, and T. lateralis limbalis in Western Oregon (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae)
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Abstract

Besides the known stridulation in stress, calling, and courtship functional categories, acoustical signals in 2 new categories, male copulation and female aggression (male rejection), are described for the genus Tropisternus. Two male positions are recognized during courtship: the forward position and the probing position. T. columbianus restricts stridulation to the probing position, whereas the other 2 species stridulate in both positions. All species of Tropisternus studied emit stress and calling chirps. T. ellipticus also has either male buzzes or slow trills during both probing and copulation. T. columbianus has male courtship slow trills. T. lateralis limbalis has male ticking during calling, and it has courtship fast trills identical to the subspecies T. l. nimbatus. Females of T. ellipticus and T. columbianus have a similar aggressive signal, the rejection buzz, which terminates courtship by males. Although courtship sounds were emitted during calling, calling sounds were never emitted during courtship.

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