Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Three Disciplines of A. E. Housman's Poetry

Brian Rosebury
Victorian Poetry
Vol. 21, No. 3 (Autumn, 1983), pp. 217-228
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40002243
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Three Disciplines of A. E. Housman's Poetry
Preview not available

Abstract

Attempts (by Cleanth Brooks and B. J. Leggett, among others) to assimilate Housman's work to the modern movement have been failures, though instructive in disclosing certain shortcomings both in modernist poetics and in Housman's own poetic theory. Housman's poetry works best when it observes three disciplines quite alien to the ironic temper of modernism: an avoidance of intellectual argument in structuring a poem, a level seriousness of tone, and a carefully preserved visual decorum. The intense composure thus attained provides the element of psychological sovereignty over pain which in modernist poetry is indicated by ironic detachment.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228