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Remembering Martin Luther King Jr. Remembering: A Response to Christopher Beem

Stanley Hauerwas
The Journal of Religious Ethics
Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring, 1995), pp. 135-148
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40015201
Page Count: 14
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Remembering Martin Luther King Jr. Remembering: A Response to Christopher Beem
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Abstract

The question of the relation of my work to that of Martin Luther King Jr. cannot be resolved with the theoretical tools Christopher Beem brings to the task. Stanley Fish has written that "those who detach King's words from the history that produced them erase the fact of that history from the slate, and they do so, paradoxically, in order to prevent that history from being truly and deeply altered." The vice of liberalism is not selfishness so much as a forgetfulness that spreads like a blight from the habit of abstraction. Martin Luther King Jr. remembered his people, his savior, and his church, and he called the rest of us to share those memories. Therein lay his strength.

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