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The Supra-Moral in Religious Ethics: The Case of Buddhism

Joel J. Kupperman
The Journal of Religious Ethics
Vol. 1 (Fall, 1973), pp. 65-71
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40016698
Page Count: 7
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The Supra-Moral in Religious Ethics: The Case of Buddhism
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Abstract

Characteristically religious ethical systems consist of much more than a morality: that is, much more than judgments marked by serious societal pressure and the appropriateness in offenders of a sense of moral guilt. Religious ethics characteristically demands also control and modification of thoughts and desires. This supra-moral element is prominent in Buddhism, where it flourishes primarily in the "Samgha". The ethics of Buddhism can be understood only by means of a concept of the supra-moral.

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