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Multiple Use Management of California's Hardwood Rangelands

Richard B. Standiford and Richard E. Howitt
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 46, No. 2 (Mar., 1993), pp. 176-182
DOI: 10.2307/4002277
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4002277
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Multiple Use Management of California's Hardwood Rangelands
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Abstract

The importance of evaluating multiple resource values on rangelands is demonstrated in this study of California's 3.0 million hectares of oak-covered (Quercus spp.) hardwood rangelands. Production functions are derived for oak tree growth on rangelands for stands with at least 50% of the total tree cover in blue oak (Quercus douglasii Hook. & Arn.) based on oak volume per acre and site index. Forage production is estimated based on oak cover, weather variables, growing period, and site factors from data reported in the literature. Hunting revenue and cost functions are derived from a survey of commercial hunting clubs, and are based on oak cover, hunter success variables, hunter demographics, advertising, livestock density, and club size. The interrelationship of these resource values is shown in output from an optimal control model that incorporates these production functions. Oak trees are gradually cleared for situations where cattle are the only economic product, whereas a residual tree canopy is maintained for cases where firewood and hunting enterprises are considered. In addition, cattle stocking is higher and net profitability is lower for the cattle only management scenario when compared with a multiple use management scenario. The development of these multiple use production functions allows the full range of resource management options to be considered.

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