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Journal Article

Modeling Sediment Storage behind Obstructions in Small Headwater Streams

Aregai Tecle, Hilaire A. Bojonell and John G. King
Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science
Vol. 33, No. 2 (2001), pp. 83-92
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40024043
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Modeling Sediment Storage behind Obstructions in Small Headwater Streams
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Abstract

This paper develops a number of empirical models to describe the relationship of sediment storage in first and second-order streams to a number of factors related to watershed and channel characteristics. One group of important factors comprises channel obstructions. In the study leading to this paper, sediment storage behind obstructions was measured on eighteen forested, mountainous drainage basins in northwestern Montana. Thirteen of the drainage basins were logged to various degrees while five of them were left undisturbed. The logged drainage basins, which differed from each other in their level and age of harvesting, were used as treatments while the undisturbed drainage basins were used as controls in the study. The objective of the study was to develop models that describe the effect of non-hydrologic factors in sediment accumulation in upland stream channels. Factors such as different stream channel characteristics, level of harvesting, channel and drainage basin slopes, number and diameter of woody debris pieces, and areas of watershed above particular stream reaches were evaluated to determine if they had any significant effect on the amount of sediment stored in first and second-order streams. The models indicate that obstructions and channel characteristics are the major factors that determine the quantity of stored sediment.

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