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Growth Dynamics of Crowns of Eastern Redcedar at 3 Locations in Oklahoma

David M. Engle and James D. Kulbeth
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 45, No. 3 (May, 1992), pp. 301-305
DOI: 10.2307/4002982
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4002982
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Growth Dynamics of Crowns of Eastern Redcedar at 3 Locations in Oklahoma
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Abstract

Eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) trees from a location in western, central, and eastern Oklahoma were aged by tree ring analysis to assess the relationship of tree age to tree height and crown area. The relationship of tree age to crown size differed with location. Trees in the oldest age class, 28 to 29 years, ranged in height from 6.2 m on the western Oklahoma location to 8.3 m on the eastern Oklahoma location. The oldest trees at all locations were still actively growing. Height growth rate of the oldest class of trees averaged 0.5 to 0.6 m yr-1 on the western and eastern study locations, respectively. Eastern redcedar reached 2.0 m in height at about 8 years of age on the eastern Oklahoma location. Trees reached 2.0 m in height in 10 to 14 years at the other locations. This suggests that burning intervals should be more frequent on the eastern Oklahoma location than on the central and western Oklahoma locations. Crown area as a function of tree age was not as similar as tree height among the 3 locations. Not only did the relationship differ among locations, but it differed also between 2 central Oklahoma range sites. Crown area of 28-year-old trees ranged from only 15 m2 on the central Oklahoma Loamy Prairie to $40\ {\rm m}^{2}$ at the eastern Oklahoma location. These data suggest that the smaller crown area of trees at the central Oklahoma location may be a result of an influence other than environment, such as an introduction of plants of a different race with an inherent columnar growth habit. The reduction in forage production associated with eastern redcedar and the efficacy of prescribed burning for controlling eastern redcedar would change more rapidly as trees age on the eastern Oklahoma location than on the other locations.

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