Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Sequence Grazing Systems on the Southern Plains

Robert L. Gillen, William A. Berg, Chester L. Dewald and Phillip L. Sims
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 52, No. 6 (Nov., 1999), pp. 583-589
DOI: 10.2307/4003627
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4003627
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Sequence Grazing Systems on the Southern Plains
Preview not available

Abstract

Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides (L.) L.) is a perennial warm-season bunchgrass that starts growth earlier in the spring than most other warm-season grasses. This suggests that combining eastern gamagrass with other warm-season grasses in a sequence grazing system could lengthen the period of rapid livestock gain. We studied sequence grazing systems consisting of eastern gamagrass and Old World bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum L.) (EG-OWB) as compared to native mixed prairie and Old World bluestem (Native-OWB) from 1993 to 1997. Crossbred beef steers averaging 239 kg grazed eastern gamagrass or native pasture from early May to early June and again from late July through August. Old World bluestem was grazed in mid season. We measured forage yield and nutritive value and steer gain. Standing forage of eastern gamagrass above a 15-cm stubble height averaged 895 kg ha-1 at the start of the first grazing period and 2,430 kg ha-1 at the start of the second grazing period. Dry, cold winter and spring weather reduced this amount to 80 kg ha-1 in May 1996 and precluded grazing the eastern gamagrass that season. Crude protein content of eastern gamagrass was greater than 14% and in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) was greater than 65% in May. By August, crude protein content had dropped to 5-8% and IVDMD was 45-50%. Peak standing crop of Old World bluestem averaged 4,580 kg ha-1 over years. Steer gain over the entire grazing season, 103 days, did not differ between forage systems, averaging 1.02 kg $\text{head}^{-1}\ \text{day}^{-1}$ in both systems. Steer gain was higher on native pasture than eastern gamagrass in the late grazing season (0.91 versus 0.60 kg $\text{head}^{-1}$ d-1, p=0.02). As a result of higher stocking rates, steer gain was 257 kg ha-1 for the EG-OWB system and 103 kg ha-1 for the Native-OWB system (P<0.01). /// El "Eastern gamagrass" (Tripsacum dactyloides (L.) L.) es un zacate perenne, amacollado, de estación caliente y que en primavera inicia el crecimiento antes que otros zacates de estación caliente. Esto sugiere que combinando el "Eastern gamagrass" con otros zacates de estación caliente en un sistema de apacentamiento en secuencia se podría alargar el período de ganancias rápidas del ganado. De 1993 a 1997 estudiamos sistemas de apacentamiento en secuencia que consistieron de "Eastern gamagrass" y "Old World Bluestem" (Bothriochloa ischaemum L.) (EG-OWB) comparado con pastizal nativo mixto y "Old World Bluestem" (Nativo-OWB). Novillos comerciales para carne con peso promedio de 239 kg apacentaron "Eastern gamagrass" o pastizal nativo de inicios de Mayo a inicios de Junio y nuevamente de fines de Julio y Agosto, el "Old World Bluestem" se apacentó a mediados de la estación. Medimos el rendimiento de forraje y su valor nutritivo y la ganancia de los novillos. La producción de forraje del "Eastern gamagrass" arriba de 15 cm de altura del rastrojo remanente promedio 895 kg ha-1 al inicio del primer período de apacentamiento y 2340 kg ha-1 al inicio del segundo período. El clíma seco y frío del invierno y primavera redujo esta cantidad de forraje a 80 kg ha-1 en Mayo de 1996, lo que imposibilitó el apacentamiento del "Eastern gamagrass" en esa estación. En Mayo, el contenido de proteína cruda del "Eastern gamagrass" fue superior al 14% y la desaparición de la materia seca in vitro (DMSIV) más del 65%. Para Agosto, el contenido de proteína cruda había disminuido al 6-8% y la DMSIV fue del 45-50%. La producción máxima promedio de forraje en pie del "Old World Bluestem" fue de 4,850 kg ha-1. La ganancia de peso de los novillos en toda la estación de apacentamiento, 103 días, no difirió entre sistemas de forraje promediando 1.02 kg ${\rm dia}^{-1}\ {\rm cabeza}^{-1}$ en ambos sistemas. En la última estación de apacentamiento, la ganancia de los novillos fue mayor en pastizal nativo que en "Eastern gamagrass" $(0.91\ {\rm vs}\ 0.6\ {\rm kg}\ {\rm dia}^{-1}\ {\rm cabeza}^{-1},{\rm P}=0.02)$. Como resultado de las altas cargas animal, la ganancia de los novillos en el sistema EG-OWB fue de 257 kg ha-1 y 103 kg ha-1 para el sistema Nativo - OBG (P<0.01).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
583
    583
  • Thumbnail: Page 
584
    584
  • Thumbnail: Page 
585
    585
  • Thumbnail: Page 
586
    586
  • Thumbnail: Page 
587
    587
  • Thumbnail: Page 
588
    588
  • Thumbnail: Page 
589
    589