If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia Seed Germination

James A. Young, Charlie D. Clements and Robert Wilson
Journal of Range Management
Vol. 56, No. 6 (Nov., 2003), pp. 623-626
DOI: 10.2307/4003937
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4003937
Page Count: 4
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia Seed Germination
Preview not available

Abstract

Repeatedly during the late 19th and early 20th century, exotic weeds were introduced to the sagebrush (Artemisia)/bunchgrass rangelands of the Great Basin. Once established these weeds became invasive, spreading without the conscious efforts of humans. Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia (Boiss.) Breistr. offers evidence this process of introduction still continues. Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia is native to southeastern Europe and Asia. It was first collected in North America near Portland, Ore. in 1911. This initial infestation apparently did not persist. The next collection was near Eureka, Nev. in 1968. Currently, Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia has spread about 200 km east and west along U S Highway 50 and 100 km north and south of the highway along secondary roads. As a first step in understanding the seed and seedbed ecology of this new invasive weed we investigated the germination of seeds at a wide range of constant and alternating temperatures. This plant produces abundant seeds that germinate over a wide range of constant and alternating temperatures. Maximum germination ranged from 84 to 94% depending on the year of seed production. Germination was extremely limited at very cold seedbed temperatures and low at the cold category of seedbed temperatures. Germination at these temperature is a competitive advantage for other exotic species on Great Basin rangelands. /// A fines del siglo 19 e inicios del siglo 20, en forma repetida, se introdujeron malezas exóticas a los pastizales de "Sagebrush" (Artemisia)/zacates amacollados de la Gran Cuenca. Una vez establecidas estas malezas vienen a ser invasoras, diseminandose si esfuerzos concientes del hombre. La especie Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia (Boiss.) Breistr. ofrece evidencia de que este proceso de introducción aun continua. Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia es nativa del sudeste de Europa y Asia, en Norteamérica fue colectada por primera vez en 1911 cerca de Portland, Ore., esta infestación inicial aparentemente no persistió; La siguiente colección fue cerca de Eureka, Nev. en 1968. Actualmente Brassica elongata ssp. integrifolia se ha diseminado 200 km al este y oeste a lo largo de la autopista US 50 y 100 km al norte y sur de la autopista a lo largo de caminos secundarios. Como un primer paso para entender la ecología de la semilla y de la cama de siembra de esta nueva especie de maleza invasora investigamos la germinación de la semilla en un amplio rango de temperaturas constantes y alternantes. Esta planta produce abundante semilla que germina en un amplio rango de temperaturas constantes y alternantes. La máxima germinación varió de 84 a 94%, dependiendo del año en que se produjo la semilla. La germinación fue extremadamente limitada en camas de siembra con temperaturas muy frías y baja en temperaturas catalogadas como frías. La germinación a estas temperaturas es una ventaja competitiva para otras especies exóticas en los pastizales de la Gran Cuenca.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
623
    623
  • Thumbnail: Page 
624
    624
  • Thumbnail: Page 
625
    625
  • Thumbnail: Page 
626
    626