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Differential Temperature Acclimatization Responses in the Membrane Phospholipids of Posthodiplostomum minimum and Its Second Intermediate Host, Lepomis macrochirus

D. Welsh, R. E. Clopton and L. Parris
The Journal of Parasitology
Vol. 92, No. 4 (Aug., 2006), pp. 764-769
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40058574
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Differential Temperature Acclimatization Responses in the Membrane Phospholipids of Posthodiplostomum minimum and Its Second Intermediate Host, Lepomis macrochirus
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Abstract

The effects of temperature change on phospholipid content in metacercariae of Posthodiplostomum minimum and their second intermediate hosts, Lepomis macrochirus, were examined to gauge similarities in the homeoviscous adaptation of host and parasite membranes to environmental thermal change. Heart, liver, and muscle tissues from individual L. macrochirus responded to environmental temperature declines with a decrease in the ratio of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC). Increases in membrane PE concentration increase membrane fluidity, maintaining fish membrane function as environmental temperature declines. However, the metacercariae of P. minimum exhibit changes in cholesterol levels, total lipid levels, and lipid composition (PE/PC) that contrast the normal changes for homeoviscous membrane adaptation exhibited by their fish intermediate hosts. The parasites seem to rely on their hosts for homeoviscous adaptation within normal developmental temperature ranges, pooling both cholesterol and PE as energetic stores for development and ontological transitions signaled by elevated temperatures.

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