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Longitudinal Study of Procrastination, Performance, Stress, and Health: The Costs and Benefits of Dawdling

Dianne M. Tice and Roy F. Baumeister
Psychological Science
Vol. 8, No. 6 (Nov., 1997), pp. 454-458
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40063233
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Longitudinal Study of Procrastination, Performance, Stress, and Health: The Costs and Benefits of Dawdling
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Abstract

Procrastination is variously described as harmful innocuous, or even beneficial. Two longitudinal studies examined procrastination among students. Procrastinators reported lower stress and less illness than nonprocrastinators early in the semester, but they reported higher stress and more illness late in the term, and overall they were sicker. Procrastinators also received lower grades on all assignments. Procrastination thus appears to be a self-defeating behavior pattern marked by short-term benefits and long-term costs.

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