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Memory for Fact, Fiction, and Misinformation: The Iraq War 2003

Stephan Lewandowsky, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Klaus Oberauer and Michael Morales
Psychological Science
Vol. 16, No. 3 (Mar., 2005), pp. 190-195
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40064200
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Memory for Fact, Fiction, and Misinformation: The Iraq War 2003
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Abstract

Media coverage of the 2003 Iraq War frequently contained corrections and retractions of earlier information. For example, claims that Iraqi forces executed coalition prisoners of war after they surrendered were retracted the day after the claims were made. Similarly, tentative initial reports about the discovery of weapons of mass destruction were all later disconfirmed. We investigated the effects of these retractions and disconfirmations on people's memory for and beliefs about war-related events in two coalition countries (Australia and the United States) and one country that opposed the war (Germany). Participants were queried about (a) true events, (b) events initially presented as fact but subsequently retracted, and (c) fictional events. Participants in the United States did not show sensitivity to the correction of misinformation, whereas participants in Australia and Germany discounted corrected misinformation. Our results are consistent with previous findings in that the differences between samples reflect greater suspicion about the motives underlying the war among people in Australia and Germany than among people in the United States.

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