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Seeing the World in Black and White: The Effects of Perceptually Induced Mind-Sets on Judgment

David Sleeth-Keppler
Psychological Science
Vol. 18, No. 9 (Sep., 2007), pp. 768-772
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40064811
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Seeing the World in Black and White: The Effects of Perceptually Induced Mind-Sets on Judgment
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Abstract

Three experiments examined the notion that rudimentary perceptual experiences can serve as powerful guides to judgments under uncertainty. The results show that exposure to certain perceptual contrast patterns can influence the direction of bias without conscious awareness. In Experiment 1a, perception of alternating black and white squares, which served as orientation markers in a lexical decision task, resulted in a reduction of the well- known anchoring bias. Similar results were obtained when alternating high- and low-pitch tones were the orientation markers (Experiment 1b). Results of a final experiment provide evidence that perceptual contrast experiences can affect judgment-relevant representations across modalities.

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