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Tropical Forests: Their Richness in Coleoptera and Other Arthropod Species

Terry L. Erwin
The Coleopterists Bulletin
Vol. 36, No. 1 (Mar., 1982), pp. 74-75
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4007977
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

Extrapolation from data about canopy insects collected by fogging methods together with estimates of tropical plant host specificity indicate that one hectare of unrich seasonal forest in Panama may have in excess of 41,000 species of arthropods. Further extrapolation of available data based on known relative richness of insect Orders and canopy richness leads to the conclusion that current estimates of Arthropod species numbers are grossly underestimated; that there could be as many as 30 million species extant globally, not 1.5 million as usually estimated.

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