Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Flightlessness and Rapid Terrestrial Locomotion in Tiger Beetles of the Cicindela L. Subgenus Rivacindela van Nidek from Saline Habitats of Australia (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae)

Sophien Kamoun and Saskia A. Hogenhout
The Coleopterists Bulletin
Vol. 50, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 221-230
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4009161
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($5.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Flightlessness and Rapid Terrestrial Locomotion in Tiger Beetles of the Cicindela L. Subgenus Rivacindela van Nidek from Saline Habitats of Australia (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Tiger beetles of the genus Cicindela L. subgenus Rivacindela van Nidek from saline habitats of Australia display great variation in locomotory behavior. A total of 30 species have been described, nine of which are flightless. A notable consequence of brachyptery in Rivacindela is the evolution of very rapid terrestrial locomotion. Brachypterous beetles reach significantly higher cursorial velocities than macropterous ones. The running speeds attained by flightless Rivacindela are the fastest ever recorded for insects. The large species, Cicindela hudsoni Sumlin, reaches a maximal speed of 2.5 m.s-1, whereas the small-sized Cicindela eburneola Sumlin, attains the remarkable relative velocity of 170 body length.s-1. The evolution of flightlessness in Australian Cicindela occurred only in Rivacindela species and in Cicindela (Macfarlandia) arachnoides Sumlin, a mimic of lycosid spiders. Correlation between flightlessness and stable and isolated habitats is noted and discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230