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'Natives Allowed to Remain Naked': An Unorthodox Approach to Medical Work at Ernabella Mission

Rani Kerin
Health and History
Vol. 8, No. 1, History, Health, and Hybridity (2006), pp. 80-99
DOI: 10.2307/40111530
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40111530
Page Count: 20
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'Natives Allowed to Remain Naked': An Unorthodox Approach to Medical Work at Ernabella Mission
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Abstract

This article examines the type of medical care provided at Ernabella Mission in far north-west South Australia during the late-1930s and 1940s. It pays particular attention to the mission's policy of discouraging the wearing of clothes by Aborigines in the interests of their health, and contrasts this with the mission's more conventional (less hybrid) medical work.

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