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Journal Article

Understanding How First-Year Seminars Affect Persistence

Stephen R. Porter and Randy L. Swing
Research in Higher Education
Vol. 47, No. 1 (Feb., 2006), pp. 89-109
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40185885
Page Count: 21
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Understanding How First-Year Seminars Affect Persistence
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Abstract

First-year seminars are nearly ubiquitous fixtures in American higher education, and research has documented their positive effect on student persistence. Only limited research, however, has attempted to isolate the impact of various aspects of first-year seminars on persistence, especially on a cross-institutional basis. We use a survey of almost 20,000 first-year students at 45 four-year institutions combined with institutional-level data to understand how aspects of first-year seminars affect early intentions to persist. Because survey respondents are grouped within dissimilar institutions, we use a multilevel modeling approach to model intent to persist.

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