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Why Is a Flower Five-Petaled?

Yutaka Nishiyama
Journal of Science Education and Technology
Vol. 13, No. 1 (Mar., 2004), pp. 107-114
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40186695
Page Count: 8
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Why Is a Flower Five-Petaled?
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Abstract

This paper examines why many flowers are five-petaled through the use of a five-petaled model that draws insights from the location of cell clusters at a shoot apex, rather than by way of the Fibonacci sequence or the golden ratio as in the past. The conclusion drawn is that flowers are most likely to be five-petaled, followed by six-petaled; four petals are unstable and almost no flower can be seven-petaled.

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