Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Looming Crisis in Graduate Science Education: Where Are America's Top Science Students?

M. J. Bozack and J. D. Perez
Journal of Science Education and Technology
Vol. 3, No. 1 (Mar., 1994), pp. 57-63
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40188465
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

Only 750 physics doctorates were awarded to American students during 1990-1991 from a population base of over 248 million people. Even institutions such as MIT are having difficulty attracting enough top American students to its graduate programs in the sciences. We discuss some of the reasons for the decline in domestic student participation in the sciences and offer several nuts-and-bolts methods to reverse this trend. Key ingredients include graduate student recruiting, motivational activities to promote the excitement of being a professional scientist, and a reeducation of employers to look more favorably toward hiring students from the basic sciences. The methods have resulted in dramatic changes in the composition of recent graduate classes; at Auburn University we now admit an incoming class composed of over 70% domestic students.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63