Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Computer Technology, Science Education, and Students with Learning Disabilities

David Kumar and Cynthia L. Wilson
Journal of Science Education and Technology
Vol. 6, No. 2 (Jun., 1997), pp. 155-160
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40188517
Page Count: 6
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Computer Technology, Science Education, and Students with Learning Disabilities
Preview not available

Abstract

The ways computer technology could be used to teach science to students with learning disabilities (LD) are explored. Science is for all students and that includes students with LD. Learning science has both cognitive and affective implications for students with LD. In this context, computer technology provides cognitively engaging and motivating instructional tools for individualizing the mode of delivery; developing expert tutors; anchoring instruction; integrating science with other subjects; reducing cognitive load on working memory; and motivating students to stay on task. These applications are discussed with implications for teaching science to students with LD.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160