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Journal Article

Do No Harm: A Comparison of the Effects of On-Line vs. Traditional Delivery Media on a Science Course

Regina Schoenfeld-Tacher, Sherry McConnell and Michele Graham
Journal of Science Education and Technology
Vol. 10, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 257-265
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40188615
Page Count: 9
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Do No Harm: A Comparison of the Effects of On-Line vs. Traditional Delivery Media on a Science Course
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Abstract

This paper presents the results of a study designed to examine the effects of distance delivery on student performance and classroom interactions in an upper level science (Histology) course. Outcomes were assessed by comparing performance on content pre- and posttests for students enrolled in on-campus and on-line sections of the same course. Interactions were classified according to initiator, topic, and Bloom's taxonomy level for content interactions. The resulting patterns were analyzed to compare behaviors in different settings. It was found that although the groups were indistinguishable in content knowledge at the outset of the study, by the end of the semester, students in the on-line group significantly out-performed their peers in the on-campus section. The on-line settings had a greater proportion of high-level interactions (according to Bloom's taxonomy) than the on-campus setting.

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