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Seven Maxims for Institutional Researchers: Applying Cognitive Theory and Research

Judith Dozier Hackman
Research in Higher Education
Vol. 18, No. 2, AIR Forum Issue (1983), pp. 195-208
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40195508
Page Count: 14
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Seven Maxims for Institutional Researchers: Applying Cognitive Theory and Research
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Abstract

The paper presents seven institutional research maxims that are based on research and theory about how people cognitively process information: (I.) More may not be better. (II.) Augment humans with models. (III.) Chunk your data wisely. (IV.) Know your decision makers. (V.) Heuristics are not always helpful. (VI.) Arrange tables by patterns. (VII.) Negative evidence and new hypotheses are okay. Cognitive findings underlying each maxim are given, with concrete examples of how institutional researchers can apply the maxims to improve the collection, analysis, and especially the presentation of information for decision makers.

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