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Occupational Sex Segregation and Job Satisfaction of Women

John C. Smart and Corinna A. Ethington
Research in Higher Education
Vol. 26, No. 2, AIR Forum Issue (1987), pp. 202-211
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40195786
Page Count: 10
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Occupational Sex Segregation and Job Satisfaction of Women
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Abstract

The results of this study indicate wide variation in the effect of occupational sex segregation on the job satisfaction of women college graduates employed in public and private organizations. Women employed in sex-balanced and male- and female-dominated occupations in the public sector have comparable levels of job satisfaction. In private firms, however, women college graduates employed in sex-balanced careers are more satisfied with the intrinsic and overall nature of their jobs than those employed in femaledominated occupations, and those in female-dominated jobs are more satisfied with the extrinsic nature of their careers than women in male-dominated jobs. The implications of these findings for those who conduct research on the career consequences of women employed in sex-dominated career fields and for college officials responsible for the educational and professional development of women college students are discussed.

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