Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

"Pokarekare": An Overlooked New Zealand Folksong?

Allan Thomas
Journal of Folklore Research
Vol. 44, No. 2/3 (May - Dec., 2007), pp. 227-237
Published by: Indiana University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40206952
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
"Pokarekare": An Overlooked New Zealand Folksong?
Preview not available

Abstract

"Pokarekare" is one of a group of New Zealand songs that became popular in the first decades of the twentieth century. The songs combined Maori and Pakeha [European] features in what can be understood as an aspect of nation building and they contributed to New Zealand identity at the time. Several of the songs originated as folksongs (though they have not previously been recognised as such) but early on were caught up in publications and performances that obscured their folk origins but kept them alive through the ensuing century.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237