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Logic and Reasoning: Do the Facts Matter?

Johan Van Benthem
Studia Logica: An International Journal for Symbolic Logic
Vol. 88, No. 1, Psychologism in Logic? (Feb., 2008), pp. 67-84
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40210821
Page Count: 18
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Logic and Reasoning: Do the Facts Matter?
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Abstract

Modern logic is undergoing a cognitive turn, side-stepping Frege's 'antipsychologism'. Collaborations between logicians and colleagues in more empirical fields are growing, especially in research on reasoning and information update by intelligent agents. We place this border-crossing research in the context of long-standing contacts between logic and empirical facts, since pure normativity has never been a plausible stance. We also discuss what the fall of Frege's Wall means for a new agenda of logic as a theory of rational agency, and what might then be a viable understanding of 'psychologism' as a friend rather than an enemy of logical theory.

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