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Recapturing a Context for Psychology: The Role of History

Ludy T. Benjamin, Jr. and David B. Baker
Perspectives on Psychological Science
Vol. 4, No. 1, Improving Psychological Science (Jan., 2009), pp. 97-98
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40212298
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

With the ever-increasing fragmentation of psychology into narrower subspecialties, the field devolves further and further into a focus on specialized knowledge , answering smaller questions and avoiding the larger and more meaningful ones. It is argued that specialized knowledge acquires its meaning only from an understanding of its place in a broader intellectual context. Psychology appears to have lost that context and perhaps the opportunity for a more significant role in modern science. An understanding of the history of psychological science offers a way to recapture that context and to prepare future psychologists to address the truly significant behavioral problems that face our world.

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