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Symptoms, Supportive Care Needs, and Function in Cancer Patients: How Are They Related?

Claire F. Snyder, Elizabeth Garrett-Mayer, Julie R. Brahmer, Michael A. Carducci, Roberto Pili, Vered Stearns, Antonio C. Wolff, Sydney M. Dy and Albert W. Wu
Quality of Life Research
Vol. 17, No. 5 (Jun., 2008), pp. 665-677
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40212669
Page Count: 13
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Symptoms, Supportive Care Needs, and Function in Cancer Patients: How Are They Related?
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Abstract

Aims To explore the associations among symptoms, supportive care needs, and function. Methods One hundred and seventeen cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey and EORTCQLQ-C30 in a cross-sectional study. Associations among function (physical, role, emotional, cognitive, social), symptoms (fatigue, nausea/vomiting, pain, dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, constipation, diarrhea), and supportive care needs (physical and daily living, psychological, patient care and support, health system and information, sexual) were tested using multivariate item regression (MIR). We tested (1) function as the dependent variable with symptoms and supportive care needs as independent variables and (2) supportive care needs as the dependent variable with symptoms and function as independent variables. Results Worse fatigue, pain, and appetite loss were associated with worse function. Greater unmet physical and daily living needs were associated with worse physical, role, and cognitive function. Greater unmet psychological needs were associated with worse emotional and cognitive function. Worse sleep problems were associated with greater unmet needs. Better physical function was associated with fewer unmet physical and daily living needs, and better emotional function was associated with fewer unmet psychological, patient care and support, and health system and information needs. Conclusions The results obtained with these models suggest several consistent relationships among symptoms, supportive care needs, and function.

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