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The Impact of Employer-Sponsored Child Care on Female Labor Supply Behavior: Evidence from the Nursing Profession

Evelyn L. Lehrer, Teresa Santero and Sumaria Mohan-Neill
Population Research and Policy Review
Vol. 10, No. 3 (1991), pp. 197-212
Published by: Springer in cooperation with the Southern Demographic Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40229844
Page Count: 16
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The Impact of Employer-Sponsored Child Care on Female Labor Supply Behavior: Evidence from the Nursing Profession
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Abstract

This paper studies the effects of employer-sponsored child care on two dimensions of the labor supply behavior of women with young children: annual hours worked and attachment to the employer. Data from the 1988 Biennial Survey of Illinois Registered Nurses are used in the empirical analysis. The provision of employer-sponsored child care is found to have significant positive effects on both aspects of labor supply.

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