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Controlling Cell Attachment on Contoured Surfaces with Self-Assembled Monolayers of Alkanethiolates on Gold

Milan Mrksich, Christopher S. Chen, Younan Xia, Laura E. Dike, Donald E. Ingber and George M. Whitesides
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 93, No. 20 (Oct. 1, 1996), pp. 10775-10778
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40230
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Controlling Cell Attachment on Contoured Surfaces with Self-Assembled Monolayers of Alkanethiolates on Gold
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Abstract

This paper describes a method based on experimentally simple techniques-microcontact printing and micromolding in capillaries-to prepare tissue culture substrates in which both the topology and molecular structure of the interface can be controlled. The method combines optically transparent contoured surfaces with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold to control interfacial characteristics; these tailored interfaces, in turn, control the adsorption of proteins and the attachment of cells. The technique uses replica molding in poly(dimethylsiloxane) molds having micrometer-scale relief patterns on their surfaces to form a contoured film of polyurethane supported on a glass slide. Evaporation of a thin (<12 nm) film of gold on this surface-contoured polyurethane provides an optically transparent substrate, on which SAMs of terminally functionalized alkanethiolates can be formed. In one procedure, a flat poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamp was used to form a SAM of hexadecanethiolate on the raised plateaus of the contoured surface by contact printing hexadecanethiol [HS(CH$_{2}$)$_{15}$CH$_{3}$]; a SAM terminated in tri(ethylene glycol) groups was subsequently formed on the bare gold remaining in the grooves by immersing the substrate in a solution of a second alkanethiol [HS(CH$_{2}$)$_{11}$(OCH$_{2}$CH$_{2}$)$_{3}$OH]. When this patterned substrate was immersed in a solution of fibronectin, the protein adsorbed only on the methyl-terminated plateau regions of the substrate [the tri(ethylene glycol)-terminated regions resisted the adsorption of protein]; bovine capillary endothelial cells attached only on the regions that adsorbed fibronectin. A complementary procedure confined protein adsorption and cell attachment to the grooves in this substrate.

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