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Satire and Irony as Means of Communication

Jean Weisgerber
Comparative Literature Studies
Vol. 10, No. 2, Special Issue in Honor of Chandler B. Beall (Jun., 1973), pp. 157-172
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40246147
Page Count: 16
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Satire and Irony as Means of Communication
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Abstract

Examination suggests that the message of literary satire is to convey a norm, whereas that of irony is to urge a search after an unknown truth; the norm is opposed to, and the truth different from, a real but allegedly unsatisfactory state of affairs. In both cases, the communication is indirect and takes the shape of an attack, whether veiled (irony) or not (satire). Satire makes the reader aware of truth, and irony of the way to truth, both at the expense of an intellectual effort, and there is something theatrical about both ways of writing. (JW)

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