If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Edwardian Science and Technology: Their Interactions

A. R. Ubbelohde
The British Journal for the History of Science
Vol. 1, No. 3 (Jun., 1963), pp. 217-226
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4024921
Page Count: 10
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Edwardian Science and Technology: Their Interactions
Preview not available

Abstract

Though quite short, the Edwardian era included a number of developments of critical importance for the interactions of science and technology. It saw the emergence of three really fundamental innovations in physics-relativity theory with its proof of the equivalence between mass and energy, quantum theory, and the disintegration of atomic nuclei. These have profoundly affected practical affairs as well as revolutionizing natural philosophy. Prominent amongst the many advances in applied science were the conquest of malaria, the mastery of aviation, the beginnings of electronics and wireless telegraphy, and the production of synthetic fertilizers by chemical industry. Successes and frustrations in British contributions to these striking changes in science and technology have an impact on history which is still being worked out.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[217]
    [217]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226