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Type-Specific Duration of Human Papillomavirus Infection: Implications for Human Papillomavirus Screening and Vaccination

Helen Trottier, Salaheddin Mahmud, José Carlos M. Prado, Joao S. Sobrinho, Maria C. Costa, Thomas E. Rohan, Luisa L. Villa and Eduardo L. Franco
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 197, No. 10 (May 15, 2008), pp. 1436-1447
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40253854
Page Count: 12
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Type-Specific Duration of Human Papillomavirus Infection: Implications for Human Papillomavirus Screening and Vaccination
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Abstract

Background. Understanding the duration of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may help find suitable end points for vaccine trials and testing intervals in screening studies. We studied genotype-specific infection duration among 2462 women enrolled in the Ludwig-McGill cohort study. Methods. Cervical specimens collected every 4-6 months were tested by a polymerase chain reaction protocol. Actuarial techniques were used to estimate the duration of HPV infection and to investigate the influence of age, number of sexual partners, and coinfection with multiple HPV types. Results. At enrollment, the prevalence of infection with high-risk HPV types was 10.6%, and the prevalence of infection with low-risk HPV types was 6.1%; incidence rates were 6.1 and 5.0 infections per 1000 women-months, respectively. Prevalent infections took longer to clear than incident infections (mean time to clearance, 18.6 months vs. 13.5 months). The mean duration of incident infection with high-and low-risk HPV varied according to the analytic approach used to measure this variable and showed considerable variation by HPV type (range, 5.1-15.4 months). Age and number of partners did not influence infection duration, whereas coinfection was associated with increased infection duration. The mean duration of HPV-16 monoinfection was 11.0 months, and the mean duration of HPV-16 coinfection was 15.4 months. Conclusion. There was considerable variation among HPV types with regard to the duration of infection. Coinfection with multiple types contributed to an increased infection duration.

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