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Influence of Thermal Environment on Food Habits of Female Cave Myotis (Myotis velifer)

Shauna R. Marquardt and Jerry R. Choate
The Southwestern Naturalist
Vol. 54, No. 2 (Jun., 2009), pp. 166-175
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40263686
Page Count: 10
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Influence of Thermal Environment on Food Habits of Female Cave Myotis (Myotis velifer)
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Abstract

For insectivorous bats in temperate regions, energetic stresses imposed by the thermal environment of a roost might cause bats to be more selective of prey consumed to compensate for increased energetic demands. We collected samples of guano from beneath maternity roosts of Myotis velifer in caves and barns in the Red Hills region of southern Kansas. Caves were cooler than barns and, thus, imposed greater energetic stress on roosting bats. We analyzed food habits to determine if diet was associated with the thermal environment of roosts in caves and barns. Food habits of adult female bats roosting in caves and barns did not differ, suggesting that females are using other methods, most likely a combination of methods, to cope with cooler temperatures in caves. /// Para murciélagos insectivoros en zonas templadas, estreses energéticos impuestos por el ambiente termal de un dormidero pueden causar que los murciélagos sean más selectivos con respeto a la presa consumida para satisfacer un aumento de demandas energéticas. Obtuvimos muestras de guano de debajo de dormideros de maternidad de Myotis velifer en cuevas y graneros en la región de Red Hills en el sur de Kansas. Las temperaturas de las cuevas estaban más frescas que las de los graneros y por eso imponian más estrés energético en los murciélagos en sus dormideros. Evaluamos la alimentatión para determinar si la dieta se asociaba con el ambiente termal de dormideros en cuevas y en graneros. La alimentación de los murciélagos adultos hembras en las cuevas y en las perchas no difirió, sugiriendo que las hembras están empleando otro método, más probable una combination de metodos, para ajustarse a las temperaturas más frescas de las cuevas.

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