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Dewey and Rawls on Education

Eric Thomas Weber
Human Studies
Vol. 31, No. 4 (Dec., 2008), pp. 361-382
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40270669
Page Count: 22
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Dewey and Rawls on Education
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Abstract

In this paper I compare the roles that the explicit and implicit educational theories of John Dewey and John Rawls play in their political works to show that Rawls's approach is skeletal and inappropriate for defenders of democracy. I also uphold Dewey's belief that education is valuable in itself, not only derivatively, contra Rawls. Next, I address worries for any educational theory concerning problems of distributive justice. Finally, I defend Dewey's commitment to democracy as a consequence of the demands of productive public inquiry and education.

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