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Family History of Various Cancers and Pancreatic Cancer Mortality in a Large Cohort

Eric J. Jacobs, Carmen Rodriguez, Christina C. Newton, Elizabeth B. Bain, Alpa V. Patel, Heather Spencer Feigelson, Michael J. Thun and Eugenia E. Calle
Cancer Causes & Control
Vol. 20, No. 8 (Oct., 2009), pp. 1261-1269
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40272097
Page Count: 9
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Family History of Various Cancers and Pancreatic Cancer Mortality in a Large Cohort
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Abstract

A family history of pancreatic cancer is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer, but uncertainty remains about the magnitude of this association, whether it varies by age or smoking and whether a family history of other cancers may also be associated with increased risk. We examined family history of 14 cancers and pancreatic cancer mortality among ~ 1.1 million men and women in Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II). CPS-II participants completed a questionnaire at enrollment in 1982. During follow-up through 2006, there were 7,306 pancreatic cancer deaths. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent or sibling was associated with pancreatic cancer mortality [multivariable adjusted rate ratio (RR) = 1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43-1.94]. This association was stronger among participants aged under 60 (RR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.67-5.02) than among participants aged 60 or older (RR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.37-1.88). Weaker associations were observed for family history of stomach cancer (RR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.11-1.37), liver cancer (RR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.10-1.43), and colorectal cancer (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.23). Results from this large prospective study indicate family history of pancreatic cancer is associated with a moderate increase in risk of pancreatic cancer, and also identify associations with the family history of certain other cancers which may be useful in generating hypotheses about shared risk factors.

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