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Imperialist Appropriation and Disciplining the Indian Mind (1857-1917): Whose History?

Aravind Ganachari
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 43, No. 5 (Feb. 2 - 8, 2008), pp. 77-87
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40276978
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Imperialist Appropriation and Disciplining the Indian Mind (1857-1917): Whose History?
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Abstract

The British decided to set up universities in India in the late 19th century keeping in mind the empire's administrative needs. But while the syllabus sought to impress upon Indian students the superiority of English institutions, it also inspired the Indian intelligentsia to demand greater political freedoms. Alarmed at this, the British made every effort to stop the teaching of English history in Bombay University. This paper looks at how the Indian leaders in the senate and outside put up a spirited opposition, determinded to use the subject to spread nationalism.

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