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Women Physicians as Vital Intermediaries in Colonial Bombay

Mridula Ramanna
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 43, No. 12/13 (Mar. 22 - Apr. 4, 2008), pp. 71-78
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40277287
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Women Physicians as Vital Intermediaries in Colonial Bombay
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Abstract

The pivot around which the improvement of maternal health revolved was the Indian woman doctor and her growing presence from the 1900s was to be seen at hospitals and welfare centres in the Bombay presidency, promoting knowledge of more hygienic birthing methods and safe infant care. These women physicians, graduates of the first five decades of the Bombay University were not only influential in coping with the serious public health challenge of maternal mortality, their excellent standard of professional skills was much appreciated and became a role model for the younger generation of women doctors.

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