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Scourge of Racism: Genocide in Rwanda

Kenneth R. White
Journal of Black Studies
Vol. 39, No. 3 (Jan., 2009), pp. 471-481
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40282573
Page Count: 11
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Scourge of Racism: Genocide in Rwanda
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Abstract

One of the major social problems of the 21st century is the problem of the color line. Racism is any activity by individuals, groups, institutions, or cultures that treats human beings unjustly because of color, physical features, and ethnicity and rationalizes that treatment by attributing to them undesirable biological, psychological, social, or cultural characteristics. Rwanda is no exception to the effects of racism. More than 800,000 Rwandans were killed in the government-directed ethnic cleansing of Tutsis and Hutus during 1994. It is considered this century's best organized genocide. New plans and visions for peace and justice must include a psychocultural segment for social therapy if the cycle of violence is to be broken in Rwanda and the Great Lakes Region.

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