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Risk and Economic Reciprocity: An Analysis of Three Regional Aboriginal Food-Sharing Systems in Late Holocene Australia

Kevin Tibbett
Australian Archaeology
No. 58 (Jun., 2004), pp. 7-10
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40287729
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Risk and Economic Reciprocity: An Analysis of Three Regional Aboriginal Food-Sharing Systems in Late Holocene Australia
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Abstract

This paper is a theoretical examination of food-sharing systems and archaeological theory. The specific aim is to assess the archaeological indicators of three different foodsharing systems, with the variable relationships between riskmanagement, social regionalisation, economic reciprocity and exchange. It is suggested that the Bogong moth (Agrotis infusa) festivities in the southern highlands of New South Wales, the Bunya nut (Araucaria bidwillii) gatherings in southeast Queensland and the seasonal food-sharing along the riverine corridors of the Lake Eyre Basin form a continuum between positive and negative reciprocity.

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