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Balancing Act: Business and Household in a Small Bolivian City

Robyn Eversole
Development in Practice
Vol. 12, No. 5 (Nov., 2002), pp. 589-601
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. on behalf of Oxfam GB
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4029404
Page Count: 13
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Balancing Act: Business and Household in a Small Bolivian City
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Abstract

Sucre is a city of micro enterprises. The lines between business and household are often blurred: accounts are mixed, space is shared, and partners from outside the household are rare. On the surface, this kind of business organisation seems most inadequate for economic success. Yet a closer look at the internal workings of Sucre's businesses suggests that the complex 'balancing act' between business and household may represent not sloppy management (as micro-enterprise development agencies often maintain), but a flexible strategy for household well-being. Sucre's businesses essentially follow 'triple bottom line' accounting at the household level, taking into account both financial and non-financial goals.

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