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What Is Development Studies?

Andrew Sumner
Development in Practice
Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov., 2006), pp. 644-650
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. on behalf of Oxfam GB
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4029921
Page Count: 7
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What Is Development Studies?
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Abstract

This article is concerned with some initial reflections on the distinctive features of Development Studies (DS). The aim is to trigger further debate, rather than attempt 'closure'. Discussion of the nature of DS is timely because of the expansion of taught courses at various levels during the previous decade; because of sustained critiques of DS in recent years; and because DS has entered a period of introspection - illustrated by several journal special issues and events - to identify its defining characteristics. The author argues that DS is a worthwhile endeavour (how could a concern with reducing global poverty not be?), but the field of enquiry needs to think about how it addresses heterogeneity in the 'Third World(s)' and how it opens space for alternative 'voices'.

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