If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Teaching as a Career? Perspectives from Undergraduate Musicians in England

Ross Purves, Nigel A. Marshall, David J. Hargreaves and Graham Welch
Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education
No. 163, 20th ISME Research Seminar, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, July 2004 (Winter, 2005), pp. 35-42
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40311593
Page Count: 8
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Teaching as a Career? Perspectives from Undergraduate Musicians in England
Preview not available

Abstract

Music is compulsory for all English secondary school pupils up until the age of 14. The current shortage of graduates wishing to pursue a career in secondary school music teaching is therefore a matter of serious concern. Taking the concept of "musical identity" as a basis, the Teacher Identities in Music Education (TIME) project investigated the attitudes of final-year undergraduate music students towards secondary school teaching as a career. Sixty-six final-year music students at six English colleges and universities completed a specially-designed questionnaire that explored their background, attitudes towards careers in teaching and music, and their views on important skills for musicians and music teachers. Although over half had been involved in teaching instrumental lessons, only 12% said they were considering a career in secondary school class teaching. Frequent reasons cited by participants for this decision were that their hearts were in professional performance, likely pupil disinterest and misbehavior, and that school working conditions were poor. In some cases, participants' own disappointing experiences of school music lessons informed their viewpoint. The results also suggested that the participants felt that schoolteachers' general teaching skills were more important than their subject-specific musical skills.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42